Eating Organic

Conventional vs. Organic Farming-  Mayo Clinic

The word “organic” refers to the way farmers grow and process agricultural products, such as fruits, vegetables, grains, dairy products and meat. Organic farming practices are designed to encourage soil and water conservation and reduce pollution. Farmers who grow organic produce and meat don’t use conventional methods to fertilize, control weeds or prevent livestock disease. For example, rather than using chemical weedkillers, organic farmers may conduct more sophisticated crop rotations and spread mulch or manure to keep weeds at bay.

 
Here are some key differences between conventional farming and organic farming:

 
Organic or not? Check the label
  • 100 percent organic. To use this phrase, products must be either completely organic or made of all organic ingredients. These products may use the USDA organic seal.
  • Organic. Products must be at least 95 percent organic to use this term.  These products may use the USDA organic seal.
  • Products that contain at least 70 percent organic ingredients may say “made with organic ingredients” on the label, but may not use the USDA organic seal.
  • Foods containing less than 70 percent organic ingredients can’t use the seal or the word “organic” on their product labels. They can include the organic items in their ingredient list, however.
 
Do ‘organic’ and ‘natural’ mean the same thing?

No, “natural” and “organic” are not interchangeable terms. You may see “natural” and other terms such as “all natural,” “free-range” or “hormone-free” on food labels. These descriptions must be truthful, but don’t confuse them with the term “organic.” Only foods that are grown and processed according to USDA organic standards can be labeled organic.

 

But why eat Organic?  Because Organic Food Is Safer.  Click here to read why.

Click here to read more about the benefits of eating organic!